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Reno’s Rancharrah unveils public face with new pavilion

Twenty-one large metal drums stay suspended from the ceiling of a renovated space in the Rancharrah estate, their hulking frames adding an industrial touch to the white-picket fence vibe of the room.

“I don’t know what to think about them yet,” said developer Chip Bowlby as he eyed the hanging set pieces on a cool autumn morning. “But they’re growing on me.”
The drums are part of a million-dollar renovation to turn John Harrah’s former photo studio into a new information pavilion for the Rancharrah redevelopment. Gone are the light panels and billboards that once filled the room. In their place is a swanky new kitchen space, some new extra beams and those suspended drums whose fates are literally — and figuratively — hanging in the air.

Although Bowlby is not quite sure about the metal drums, his affection for the Rancharrah project is unquestionable. Despite having his hand in several other high-profile developments across the area, only Bill Harrah’s former estate has made him break one of the cold, cardinal rules for development.

“I told myself I would never fall in love with another project again,” Bowlby told a small gathering during an early Thursday preview.

It’s a familiar phrase to those who have heard him talk about Rancharrah in the last year. When faced with the history of the estate some describe as Reno’s Camelot, however, Bowlby says he just couldn’t help himself. Today, he feels that preserving the legacy of the property does not just make good business sense but is part of his responsibility.

Although Bowlby is not quite sure about the metal drums, his affection for the Rancharrah project is unquestionable. Despite having his hand in several other high-profile developments across the area, only Bill Harrah’s former estate has made him break one of the cold, cardinal rules for development.

“I told myself I would never fall in love with another project again,” Bowlby told a small gathering during an early Thursday preview.

It’s a familiar phrase to those who have heard him talk about Rancharrah in the last year. When faced with the history of the estate some describe as Reno’s Camelot, however, Bowlby says he just couldn’t help himself. Today, he feels that preserving the legacy of the property does not just make good business sense but is part of his responsibility.

Read the full article on the Reno Gazette Journal:
http://www.rgj.com/story/money/reno-rebirth/2016/11/03/renos-rancharrah-unveils-public-face-new-information-pavilion/93245968/

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