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More bars, more houses, and other Reno trends to watch for in 2018

Next year, Frey Ranch Estate Distillery in Fallon will release its four-year aged bourbon. Other things will probably happen too, but none will stand out as such an important occasion.

Oh right, except increasing population growth, income inequality, ongoing redevelopment, fears of gentrification and a new Reno flag.

Here are the important Reno life trends and events to look out for in 2018.

Significant population growth

All of the predictions by the Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada have stayed on track so far. Meaning Northern Nevada’s population and job growth will continue to force housing construction and business growth in the region.

Growth is hitting the Reno area hard, but turmoil plagues the region's top planning board that has the final say-so over major projects. (Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Growth is hitting the Reno area hard, but turmoil plagues the region’s top planning board that has the final say-so over major projects. (Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)


The physical size of the Reno-Sparks valley will cause more construction to push into the North Valleys and south toward Washoe Valley, according to conversations the RGJ has had with Washoe County officials about upcoming projects. More than 100 developments planning 59,000 housing units throughout the Reno-Sparks-Cold Springs-Verdi region are in the works. One of the largest is the 5,600-unit Evans Ranch near Cold Springs and a 4,000-unit Kiley Ranch in Spanish Springs.

As the population grows, demand on housing of all types will increase. Many housing developers seem to be favoring luxury apartments and luxury houses, like the Toll Brothers houses in south Reno and the Midtown Lofts houses in Midtown, creating a large rental market and larger high-price house market.

But some developers, such as HabeRae properties and Reno Land Inc., are looking for alternatives in smaller projects. HabeRae wants to redevelop motels and Reno Land Inc. plans mixed-use housing projects. The Truckee Meadows Regional Planning Agency also recommended more infill development and density to planners and developers. They said this would lower infrastructure costs and provide more middle-income housing choices.

Developers say the prices for sewer hook-ups make density more difficult and less cost effective than building a large house and selling it for more. We’ll see if the city can find ways to make density more cost effective in 2018.

Source: Reno Gazette-Journal

http://ux.rgj.com/story/life/2018/01/03/wary-redevelopment-and-4-other-reno-trends-watch-out-2018/936701001/

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